Featured

Copyright Statement |Lindiswa Jan

This website and its content is copyright of Lindiswa Jan – © Lindiswa Jan 2019. All rights reserved.

Any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited other than the following:

you may print or download to a local hard disk extracts for your personal and non-commercial use only

you may copy the content to individual third parties for their personal use, but only if you acknowledge the website as the source of the material

You may not, except with our express written permission, distribute or commercially exploit the content. Nor may you transmit it or store it in any other website or other form of electronic retrieval system.

Statement issued and signed by Lindiswa Jan: Friday, 13/9/2019.

20190913_213236_0000

Statement issued and signed by Lindiswa Jan: Friday 13 September 2019.

Website: janlindiswa.wordpress.com

E-mail: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

We Tweet What We Like: Steve Biko and Dr. Frances Cress Welsing| Lindiswa Jan

We Tweet What We Like: Steve Biko and Dr. Frances Cress Welsing| Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.
Black Consciousness: In 1970, Afrocentric African American psychiatrist, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing, published her seminal essay, The Cress Theory of Color-Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy).
Following after and on the footsteps of Algeria’s Frantz Fanon in black psychiatry, Dr. Welsing unmasked whiteness and white supremacy to the core. While Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks focus on the inferiority complex of the black man and black woman, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing’s essay removed the veil on the white man and white woman’s superiority complex.
Accounting for the need to pursue psychiatry in the interest of the health and well-being of black people globally, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing explained that a black patient sparked the interest and pushed her towards the direction of black psychiatry. Suffering from severe mental and emotional health problems, the patient told Dr. Frances Welsing, “if only we could find the key to the colors.” This is the most painful and troubling statement Dr. Welsing recount about the beginning of her journey in black psychiatry.
Sometime in the 1960s, she began her journey to understand the cause of black trauma and mental health breakdown by attending some of the Black Panther Party meetings. She needed information to put the missing pieces of the puzzle together. To her god-sent opportunity/miracle, it was in a Black Panther gathering that she came across and met, for first time, her mentor, Mr. Neely Fuller, author of “The United-Independent Compensatory Code/System/Concept Textbook: A Compensatory Counter-Racist Code.”
Speaking at the Black Panther meeting, Mr. Neely Fuller explained that black people were and still suffering from an organised global system of white supremacy. Awakened to a new realisation, Dr. Frances Cress Welsing pursued Mr. Neely Fuller’s remarks to ponder further, “why would white people design such a system?” This is the most important question Dr. Frances Cress Welsing asked.
Previous research and analyses of the global imbalances, black trauma and suffering, do not go into and interrogate the white world of its essence. What it means to be white. How is this projected to the world? The white world is left unquestioned of its emergence and doings in the world. It is this question Dr. Frances Cress Welsing asked that unveils and unmasks an inferiority complex so deep in the white world that it causes global imbalances, trauma and mental health breakdown in the black community.
Her analysis is a balancing of scales with Frantz Fanon’s interrogation and analyses of the black world, and the colonially projected and imposed inferiority complex in the global black community and between the black man and black woman.
With the research and subsequent publication of her seminal essay, The Cress Theory of Color-Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy), Dr. Frances Cress Welsing lost permanent employment as faculty staff. However, her essay and the lost employment opportunity placed her on the path of an independent practising psychiatrist until her passing in January 2, 2016.
Despite her rejection by the white world, the publishing of her essay sent shock waves around the globe. She continued researching, writing and publishing her findings on white supremacy (racism) and the implication of mental health breakdown in the non-white world, and particularly black people.
She produced and published a total of 25 essays on the neurological analyses and breakdown of white supremacy (racism). And somewhere in South Africa, was a rising Black Consciousness writer and teacher, Steve Biko.
A student of Frantz Fanon and adherent of the Black Panther Party, Steve Biko penned and wrote his own black psychology thesis, I Write What I Like, as a response to the psychologically repressive, white supremacist settler government in South Africa.

Undoubtedly influenced by Frances Cress Welsing’s papers, Steve Biko’s book was released in 1978, following the Black Panther Party teachings of black self-love and black beauty.
To this day, his psychological thesis remains the source of analysis and strength for generation after generation of black consciousness students in South Africa and across the globe. But it is important to note and underscore the linkages in the works of these awesomely noteworthy African spiritual warriors, mental health healers and global scholars for future generations.
As seen from the social media intense and interconnected world of the 21st century, the global white supremacy (racism) war on the non-white world continues!
If Steve Biko was alive today, he would defiantly tell the African National Congress government and the world, I tweet what I like.
But as a global tradition inherited from global black icons of pan Africanism and black consciousness, 21st century black consciousness writers, hip hop artists, political activists and black nationalists are increasingly rising, picking up where the ancestors left off.
Since the year 2012, there has been an avalanche and growing wave of information flow on the global condition of the non-white world and particularly black people. In response to this, the rising global black consciousness writers, artists, political activists and black nationalists have gone as far as revisiting Africa, from antiquity, to recollect their memory of self. In the form of written works, art depictions, documentaries, and new forms of expression, the rising black stars have flooded the global none-white world and black community with an avalanche of information on how to cleanse off the experience of white supremacy (racism).
And caught in its own cross fire, the white world has been left in a state of indecision and war with itself. North America has brought up slavery and reparations for all the sins against the abducted and enslaved Africans.
France is confronted for colonising and indebting African countries to its demons. Britain is forced to return all stolen items from the African colonial territories.
China is taking over the world. And South Africa is demanding the return of its stolen land.
Perhaps still searching for a scapegoat, the white world is engaged on numerous backfiring tactics to bypass its sins.
As we are learning so much about the injustice of the white world, we are learning to love ourselves again. At times we become brain dead from the travesties of white racism.
We suffer comas, and stay in long recovery mental breakdowns. At times we do not know what to do. But we know who we are. We are black and children of Africa. We love who we are, and where we come from. One day we will stand up and rise to our greatness again.
But that time has not come yet. Perhaps the ancestors are still cleansing us. They are healing us from the wounds that have made us doubt ourselves.

Up Ye Mighty Race, Accomplish Your Will!
Article by: Staff writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.
Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute and Art collage, from global Africans.

Twitter: Follow us at: @LindiswaJan
Facebook: Follow us at: @LindiswaMJan
Email us at: Lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

Dr Frances and Steve Biko

The Black Madonna and Child: Africa’s Precious Jewels| Critical Reflections-Lindiswa Jan

The Black Madonna and Child: The Precious Jewels of Africa| From
Critical Reflections to Lindiswa Jan
Global Africans: Not many African people know that the American statue of liberty and the Senegalese statue of African renaissance are actually modelled from a historical fact about the African woman and child (The Black Madonna and Child).
The image of the Black Madonna and Child often eludes the minds of Africans as actually a depiction of the African woman when she has awakened to her goddess spirited self. The birth of the child, the Son, is often the beginning and completion of the cycle of life, a resurrection of the Holy Trinity Family.
This is a very historical, highly sacred event of cosmic proportion that sees the end of one world and the birth of a new one. Opposites cannot exist at the same time. One must give way for another exist.
This tells us that to be in an imbalanced world of spiritually degenerated spiritual warriors is part of the normal course of the circle of life. This will go on until we reach the stage that is necessary for the cleansing of earth for a new humanity.
The western civilization as we know it is a normal experience of humanity at its worst and most degenerated stage of the human circle of life. For humanity to have to degenerate to the low levels we are in today there must have been a cosmic disturbance that caused the downward spiralling of social relations. And the global black community catches the worst of the cosmic Dracula chaos when found wanting. So we must have done the worst to cause the universe to disintegrate as it has for the years we have been enslaved. As the biblical custodian of the cosmos, we shouldn’t cause cosmic disturbances when we are given power to rule. Ours causes cosmic significance.
The story began when the black god, Osirus, was killed and dismembered into 14 pieces by his jealous brother, Set. Set, entangled in his unrighteous rulership of the earth, faced the wrath of Isis, goddess Maat, as she set on to bring back to life her righteous ruler, Osirus, from the dead. Resurrected and brought back to life, Isis and Osirus conceived and birthed the heir of righteous rulership, Horus/Heru. Set, the destructive god of materialism, went into battle with Horus/Heru, the cosmic and righteous prince, and lost the battle.
Born out of righteousness, Heru with his goddess-mother Isis re-established the cosmic rulership of the earth, for the righteous living of the children of the Son, Osirus.
Defeated, Set was expelled and excommunicated into the wilderness, perpetually seeking fulfilment and self-gratification.
This is how goddess Isis, the Black woman, the Mother of the Son, now known and worshipped as the Black Madonna and Child, in Europe, become the periodical symbol of the resurrection of the Black nation/family/man, in order to complete the Holy Trinity.
However, the greatest travesty with the European colonial destruction of the African memory of self is the theft and covering up of the eons of African history. With the colonial conquest came the natural inclination to forever blind the African to his and her legacy of antiquity and inheritance of righteous rulership of the earth.
Since the conquest of Africa, western agents have engaged in a psychological warfare so complete to destroy and disfigure the memory of African people – completely blinding Africans for who we have been and what we were doing before our cosmic rulership of the earth was interrupted and usurped with colonialism and warfare conquest.
But truth and reality cannot be hidden forever. It can be momentarily diverted and misused for a period of time, but time is the revealer and reveller of truth. What does not stick naturally is not truth nor reality. And this is what the European, as the descendants of Set, have never been able to phantom.

For two thousand years they have engaged in a fruitless but dangerous psychological warfare to unnaturally twist the psychology of the African into material beings of the earth. And Africans, in the most unsuspecting and naïve fashion, rolled up a red carpet for the European to dance on the graves of our ancestors with impunity. Forever enjoying indulging in gross injustices and grotesque unrighteousness, the European thought and conceived himself as beyond reproach. That the laws of righteousness and justice do not apply to him. That he is above the laws of Maat and can violate anyone and everyone without consequences.
But far from the truth, justice and righteousness, the European has not yet contemplated in his mind the reality that, with unrighteousness, injustices and deceit, all civilizations come to an end. And his was a two thousand years season of gross human disfigurement experiment. He is about to be left wanting, forever seeking himself, for a fulfilment that will never be his, because he is lacking in Spirit. His two thousand seasons is over. The laws of Maat are rolling and in motion.
Science
In his precious lecture series turned books on Africa, global Africans and the history of white supremacy, Dr. Amos Wilson explains that civilisations rise and fall. It is the natural law of nature. Before there was the European, there was an African and African civilisation. Caught in a declining state of righteous rulership, the African man and African civilization in all its variations caused a cosmic shift and burst that teared down the cosmic protective womb of righteousness. Left in a perpetual state of wailing and groaning, the African woman was left to fend for herself for the African man had broken down and into pieces the cosmic womb of goddess Isis. With goddess Isis in cosmic pain, her womb ripped apart, unable to conceive of righteousness, truth and justice, the African man had to face cosmic punishment for his unrighteousness. Cosmic mama unleashed Set and his descendants on Osirus and his descendants, forever leaving them wailing and groaning for Cosmic mama’s mercy.
From the first decline of the African dynasties, Set was unleashed. While contemporary studies of human history date Africa’s bewilderment to two thousand years ago, in truth, the African holocaust began with the decline in early dynasties. That is history cast in stones, with more preceding it. When you read the bible, you will learn that Africans have been in cosmic banishment and bewilderment for ages instead of centuries. Until we complete that circle we will not be free from the European grip over us.
African people would not be in the current state of severity in psychological disfigurement if it was not for a longer period than two thousand years of memory loss. Two thousand years is the tip of the iceberg. It only places us closer to another period of remembrance as we move back and closer to where we were before the holocaust. You only need to follow the timeline to see this.
When you read the most recent African history, you learn that there have been conflicts afflicting early dynasties in upper and lower Nile Valley, down to the southern tip of Africa.
These conflicts show that the downward spiralling of the African civilization is longer than what Europe has been able to record. This tells that there have been ages that long preceded the most recent ages, like the ice age or the fall of the dynastic African age. Moving down to the Assyrian and roman invasion of Africa we are only seeing the glimpse of what it is to be an African. The depth of the iceberg has been unreachable to the limited eye of the European. The two thousand years of enslavement of Africa and Africans, is evidently the only time that the European has been able to completely reign and rule over Africa. Prior to this period, Europe has been engaged in a battle to overthrow the righteous rulership of Africans since antiquity.
Now fearing cosmic castration, being outlawed and ex-communicated out of Africa, Europe is still engaging Africa in warfare, trying to maintain the unrighteous rulership of materialism imposed on Africans as people of the earth.
As we see with the end of the cold war towards the late 1980s and early 1990s, there was a complete death in the African psyche. The two thousand seasons of European colonialism and conquest of Africans have been so violent and incessantly aggressive that Africans grew tired and fatigued from the warfare. Global Africans repeatedly engaged in numerous campaigns for the independence of Africa from white terrorism and slaughter. The global black community suffered immeasurable blows and heartaches with the assassinations of its front men, poets, musicians, politicians and artists.
But knowing and understanding the history of Africa, now ancestor Amos Wilson always cautioned Africans to not languish in the seemingly gloom and doom state of white terror. White supremacy, like civilizations before it, will fall. It is a natural law of the universe –the laws of Maat. For Set is and has always been an unrighteous and unstable ruler to rule the earth.
Cosmic mama, The Black Madonna, goddess Isis has awakened from her wailing and groaning from pain. Having healed from her wounded womb, she has begun engaging Set and his descendants on a war of resurrecting Osirus. We see it with the killing of black men in America. We see it with the increase in the propaganda machine for the diversion of the world’s sympathies towards European insensibilities.
But regardless of the delaying tactics, Europeans, as the children of Set, will be subject to a prolonged cosmic bewilderment. The ice age is nothing. They will be in eons of bewilderment. They will be the greatest taboo and unmemorable memory in the lives of Africans. With time, their story will be told as a myth –a bed time story. This is the cycle of life of the humanity of the African.

Up you mighty race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Critical Reflections for Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

The Black Madonna and Child

 

African Cultures and Modernisation, What Is Not Said| Lindiswa Jan

African Cultures and Modernisation, What Is Not Discussed| Lindiswa Jan
As North Korea is facing pressure from its enemies and oppositions, not many people understand that culture is power. To have a culture is to have power over your identity and destiny. Nigeria is a culture-rich African country hence the attacks from Boko Haram. It takes a wealth of information, commitment to self-preservation and a desire to compete with other countries or states that such countries exist as they do. If it were not for self-interest Nigeria and North Korea would not make the news. Their material cultures matter to them as participants in the global political economy. The countries are willing to go at lengths to preserve their cultures and their people. Their cultures and people are drivers of the economies and political engagements. It makes sense to protect and empower them with global cutting edge information and technologies.
The colourful cultures that boast African flags are representations of civilisations that existed since the times of the Nile Valley civilisations and empires. So civilisation and modernity greeted Africa a long time. The hieroglyphs and pyramids in Egypt are proofs that Africans fought all round and full circle to keep and maintain their cultures. They wrote and left, on the walls of the temples and shrines, information about their past and futures in Egypt.
The challenge now is that Africa has been conquered and oppressed for a very long time since those civilizations existed and fell. But regardless of the oppression Africans suffer and face in modernising and inventing new cultural technologies and fashions for Africa, we remain the modern cultures of the world. In our imaginations the continent is not left out and behind as it is at the forefront of modernity and modernisation. It is from our ancient civilisations that the west and the rest of the world take the cues to invent and fashion material cultures. The light bulb was first invented in Egypt before they saw the light in the west. Our African ancestors invented and scribed on the walls the aircraft and ship inventions. The afro-hair comb was invented at the time of the Egyptian pharaohs and dynasties. All these and others were material culture inventions to aid Africans in their economies, political engagements and trades.
When the invasions and wars of conquest took place it was because of and was an intrusion against the advancement of Africa. Africa had been dominant with its empires civilisation at the time. The world was ruled by Africa. In the destruction of Africa Chancellor Williams shows and argues that African civilisations brought peace and order in the world. The destruction of the continent was out of jealousy and resentment for Africa’s advancement in the east and the west. Africa was a global player; the east and the west conspired to destabilise Africa in order to take away the continent’s reigning power. Since the Assyrian invasion followed by the western conquest Africa suffered a debilitating defeat. The continent has now been on life-support for centuries on end without the ability to stand up and fend for herself and her children. Because of the magnitude of the fall the invading and conquering blocks are still devouring on the sleeping giant.
But regardless of the current state of affairs for Africa, Africans need to read history and do as they learn about the journey and the fate of the continent. It is this time of the new age, the 21st century new millennium that Africa needs to update herself with the new technologies. Putin spoke about it as the age of artificial intelligence in one interview with the media. In the interview, Putin argued that whoever invents cutting edge artificial intelligence will rule the world. The artificial intelligence he was talking about is any piece of technology that brings about answers to today’s questions and challenges.
In light of the need for artificial intelligence, the issue that Africans need to keep their African cultures intact is always disputed as backward or regressive by western contemporaries. To them Africa need to open itself up to external influences for reason that Africa need to modernise. That Africa is modern as it stands is not apparent to them. Reading on “Maqoma’s Last War” brings out the realisation that for the British to seek the colonisation of Africa as they do, it matters a lot to them that they colonise the south. Africa is a big continent in the south and its colonisation means accumulation of vast wealth for the west. And the wars that are fought by North Korea and the threat of terrorism in Nigeria are very important to note by Africans. Nigeria is a very powerful county in Africa. Its re-colonisation means a significant defeat for Africa. For as long there is a culturally independent country in Africa, Africans can still breathe life. South Africa is still held at arm’s length by British colonisers. They take the form of big corporations now. And the battle to set ourselves free from western imperialism is raging in the form of street protests in South Africa. The Marikana Tragedy is one unexpected outcome of the imperialist wars faced by South Africans. Nigeria needs to protect itself.
In the face of an advancing enemy North Korea has maintained its military power with its cutting edge missile technology. I argue that they are within their right to maintain their military power in the face of an enemy that keeps changing faces. For a while now North Korea has been represented as a boogie man of the international relations. That North Korea is pursuing its own interests by inventing war technologies to protect its Dynastic culture is not mentioned by America and its allies. As the conversation about North Korea continues what is at stake is culture. And North Korea promises her people that the president will protect his people and culture by all means necessary.
As I watch and follow the conversation on North Korea I note necessary points that Africans should heed as the continent is pursued from all corners. Although Africans are seemingly dependent on external donors the truth is the donors depend on Africa.

The money they give back to Africa is generated from African resources. It is only that Africans need to wake up a little more. We have been on a long sleep now. We have to return to our forms of government and governance to see what is going on. As of our culture, we cannot have a single African child go hungry anymore. We have to fight to regain our consciousness of who we are and always have been before we were invaded and conquered.

Let us not have culture day celebrations anymore but eat breath and speak our cultures. Our culture is our priced commodity we need to sell and not marginalise.

North Korea can teach us a lot about culture preservation.

Up you mighty race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Staff Writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

The Ancestral Land For Return| Lindiswa Jan

The Ancestral Land, For Return| Lindiswa Jan
It is now common knowledge that the South African land was annexed and stolen from African people. It serves no purpose to twist or hide this truth. It should be returned and redistributed to Africans without compensation. There are many uses Africans need the land for.
When our ancestors lived on the land, they worked it and produced food while maintaining it for herding and ancestral worship. The land use was ancestral, economic and political. Africans made reference and reverence to the ancestors with all that they did and produced with the land.
Now the land question has been running around in circles like a dog tail. It serves us no purpose to be kept in this state of affairs because Africans, unlike the fear that we cannot manage the land, can manage and produce from the land. From gardening in the backyards to managing industrial farms as African we can and we manage the land. To us the land is ancestral first before political. It is not even personal. That the land should be used for industrial farming is a given even though Europeans themselves claim ancestral argument when they make their claim on the land. In fact, while researching in the Eastern Cape I learned that a significant number of farms are not used for industrial farming at all. They are kept for personal ownership to the farmers. If not kept for personal ownership the lands are said to be not arable. This is a surprising excuse from the farmers considering the fertility of the land in the Eastern Cape. It is not rocket science to know that the land is fertile and arable in the Eastern Cape. The Eastern Cape landscape boasts fertility for most foods and plants. Now on top of being landless, Africans in the Eastern Cape are without jobs in the farms because some farmers do not farm anymore.
When Robert Mangaliso Sobukhwe said that the land is ours he meant that literally. In that statement there was a plea that “please do not argue with us about it, the Land is ours”. What he meant was that the land should be handed over to us the descendants of the Africans who were stripped off from the land. He was referring to the entire South African landscape up to the borders of the front-line states. In its failure to properly conceptualise and manage the return of the land program and processes, the African National Congress has opted for a quiet stance and mimicry on the land question. At times it makes solid claims for the return of the land learning from the Pan Africanist Congress, and other times it speaks about percentages return of the land. The fact that the land is ancestrally tied to and belongs to Africans is a dreaded reality and conversation by the European people and particularly Afriforum and the movement alike. But the conversation is a must because everything is tied to the land. Without the land African people remain domestic workers, gardeners, cleaners, street beggars and servants to European people and institutions.
African people cannot run businesses because the current and apartheid land ownership makes laws that are discriminatory against Africans.

Owning and renting business spaces in Cape Town and other big cities is tied to high prices and industrial corporations. The only people who have access to these places are people with access to upper echelons and our hitherto colonisers.
The laws that the current colonial and imperialists institutions make are in the favour of advancing the interests of western corporations. The European led institutions make laws that continue to maintain the colonial and apartheid missions of the colonisers. While the constitution is seemingly protecting everyone it is in fact tied closely and neatly to the protection of western corporations and individuals. The corporations and individuals continue to build their empires at the expense of African people. In Cape Town the violence of western corporations is more pronounced. They are now gentrifying the city kicking out the descendants of the Cape Malay slaves. Big corporations are building blocks of flats catering to the middle class and student populations. I cannot speak nor bother about the informal settlements that African people are subjected too. They have become synonymous with being black. No other settlement is suitable for black people but informal settlements. And the constitution is mum on the rights of these people.
That African people have been dealt a big blow with the retainment of the land by Europeans is a serious issue and conversation that only the future generations will try to imagine. The land question has been resiliently reported and spoken of by the Pan Africanist Congress. The social movement “Abahlali Basemjondolo” and now BLF (Black First Land First) have repeatedly poured their outcries about the land question. The land is ours we should get it back.
With the landless conditions faced by Africans one would think and assume that Africans ought to go to the United Nations to make a claim that African people own the land in South Africa. When groups of people are endangered it is within their rights to visit and make claims at the United Nations. The informal settlement patterns of housing are inhumane. The discriminatory access to business opportunities for black people is unconstitutional. The gentrification of the Boland and other areas is unconstitutional. These are all activities carried out by western corporations as they buy the unreturned land from the government.
With this state of affairs it is important to note that the wars of Maqoma, Hintsa, Shaka and many other Kings were fought in order for African people to retain their land. There are many lives that were lost by Africans for us to be accepting of any other conditions other than the return of the land. This is not an emotional claim; it is a call from the ancestors. They left us messages when they were detained and abused by apartheid and colonial rulers for the land. African people are owed the land. Those with ownership over it must return it. It belongs to Africans.

Up you mighty race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Staff Writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

“For the Love of Humanity”

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

Building Black Families, For Black Economies| Lindiswa Jan

Building Black Families, For Black Economies| Lindiswa Jan
The family unit is the most important aspect of the economy. Advertisers sell their products to segments of the family –and others sell to the entire family. How family is structured and managed matters a lot. It is important to know who manages it. And children are the most important and vulnerable people and segment for the future of the community and the country.
From statistical data the black family is the most dysfunctional and unmanaged of all families in communities. The history of its dysfunction stretches and reaches as far back as from the creation of labour migrations and labour reserves laws. With the destruction of African Kingdoms the black family structure was also destroyed. This is because historically black families were tied to their Kingdoms and rulership.

Over time and with the labour migrations black people have felt and seen the multi-facet consequences of black children growing without supervision and guidance from both their parents.
Children who grow up without their parents are placed at the risk of falling victim to school dropout and early teenage pregnancies. Growing up without both parents in their lives affects their self-esteem in some areas of their lives. While other children speak of and enjoy the company of both their parents these children feel left out and on the margins. I too have felt this marginalisation from the age of eight. My grandfather had passed away three years back and we had to begin schooling in 1990. Having grown up with my grandfather accompanying us for important tasks, I surely missed him when I began schooling. It was indeed a big and auspicious moment for me but I surely missed him and his company for my first day at school. Like many other children in school I began depending on myself for many tasks and challenges. I was challenged to imagine my future without him supervising and guiding me.
My story is similar to little *Sophia’s story. Little Sophia grew up without her mother and father in her life. She was raised by her cousin in the presence of their grandmother for guidance. Her mother returned with her from Port Elizabeth and left her with her grandmother and cousin. Her cousin raised little Sophia until she was seven years old.
In the early l990s little Sophia’s mother slowly became depended on alcohol that made her abscond her responsibilities towards little Sophia. That her cousin was there to look after little Sophia helped her mother completely disregard the well-being of little Sophia. It became her cousin who woke up in the middle of the night to change her towel napkin. She had to wash them too. It was her cousin who took her to the clinic for injections and other clinical observations and check-ups. When little Sophia was clinically not picking healthy scales it was her cousin who went to the clinic to collect the body-building nutrients and vitamins. So little Sophia does not know how it feels like to be cared for and looked after by both her parents. This upsets her very much.
Now 26 years old little Sophia has two children –daughters. One stays with her family in the Eastern Cape while she is raising her infant new-born. While conversing with her she let it out that she is a violent woman today because she does not know the love of her mother. When her cousin had to move to Cape Town to further her studies little Sophia lost a guardian angel and eventually dropped out of school in the Eastern Cape. When her cousin returned her to school in Cape Town, little Sophia could not and did not manage to stay at school. She says she was too heartbroken when her cousin left her for Cape Town. The experience felt like a serious rejection. Eventually she sought attention from a boy and she fell pregnant with her first daughter.
Little Sophia has two cousins who are in a similar situation. Nomangesi and Bee live by themselves. Their late mother raised them while alcohol dependent. She passed away and left them with nothing. They have had to learn to look after themselves from nothing. They are now backyard dwellers at Mfuleni.
These are now grown-up children who when they recount their stories one cannot help but feel the pain of families divided and broken. It is the children that suffer from unhealthy relationships between the black man and black woman. Parents who are broken and have alcohol dependency challenge leave an unattractive mark on their children. If born in poverty they sometimes repeat the circle and raise their children in similar conditions.
Although they both suffer from broken families, little Sophia and Nomangesi are mum about the fact that they continue the circle with their children. Their children are also affected by the out of wedlock child births they brought them through. They could not account for the future of their children as they are both unmarried and on shaking grounds with the fathers of their children. Little Sophia lives with her uncle in her own dwelling. The father of her daughter supports her and the child but both cannot say if they have a future together. What that means is that the child will be in limbo until the parents decide her future.
I do not count myself out when I speak of children born out of a degenerate circle. I gave birth to my daughter alone and raised her with my family. Her father’s family contributed in her being raised well. But circumstances never allowed her to be raised by both her father and mother. I always make it my business to express my dislike for disappointing her to grow up without her father. What else can I do? For me it all went wrong when my grandfather passed on. He was the father figure I needed growing up into my teen years. But in my teen years I was fatherless.
This is a pattern that has been normalised in the black community. Even television adverts, particularly Pampers, advertise their black market diaper product without a father figure. It is as though it is normal not to have a father figure for black children. The consequence of the absent father figure is a continued circle of fatherlessness and drunken mothers for black children.
While the foster care system works for abused and neglected children, it will serve the children and the nation well to build a population of children who live and enjoy their lives with both their parents.The last time I felt loved is when I lived with my grandfather and my grandmother. When my grandfather passed away I never felt what it feels like to be loved and appreciated by a father figure. Little Sophia tells me she does not even have a memory of how it feels like to be loved and appreciated by a father figure. Nomangesi told me it is not something she bothers talking about if her father does not bother.
To build black families is to build economies. The black family is on life support and need to be revisited in order to build a strong nation. Black children truly suffer from broken families. At most they continue the circle of teenage pregnancies and alcohol dependency.

Up you mighty race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Staff Writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

Dreams Deferred, The Case For Black Struggle| Lindiswa Jan

Dreams Deferred, The Case For Black Struggle| Lindiswa Jan.
To be black it is common place to have one’s dreams differed. I have suffered from mental illness while completing my studies twice. In both instances I have had to have my programs delayed until I get better. I went on to work as menial labour until such time I feel better. While in the process of regaining my strength I have conducted general and particular research for my work.
While I walked around in a township I stopped and conversed with street vending entrepreneurs. In my questioning mind I wanted to know to what extent does street vending open up opportunities for them. On this day I settled down with one woman who sells braai meat. As we settled down she offered and prepared us braai meat while we conversed.

Her name is Mrs. *Nompilo. I began telling Mrs. Nompilo my story that I am on a medical break but would love to know more about her and her street vending business.
Mrs. Nompilo began and told me that she has been selling braai meat for ten years now. Her husband died from illness that had made his life difficult for a long time. For long he was a regular visitor at the hospital and his illness was an extra expenditure for the family. But when he passed on Mrs. Nompilo suffered very much and eventually began the braai meat business. Mrs. Nompilo admits that in the beginning she did not think much about the business. She was trying it because she lost income from the death of her husband. She was not employed at the time and depended on her husband’s salary when he was still alive. Her husband’s death meant that there is no income but only suffering for her. On advice by one of the street vending entrepreneurs she took a remaining income she received from a burial club and invested it on the braai meat for business. On the first day of selling the meat she earned a lot of income and decided to pursue the braai meat business permanently. She returned her children to school and the rest was history.
Mrs. Nompilo is originally from the Eastern Cape and she was born with eight siblings with two of them now late. Another two of her siblings are also married and live in the Eastern Cape. The remaining four are unmarried and live by themselves in Gauteng and in the Eastern Cape. Her mother is guardian to her siblings’s children on her state pension grant. Mrs. Nompilo migrated and moved to Cape Town after she was married to her husband in 1995. She lived in Khayelitsha working as a domestic worker until she moved to Delft with her husband and family. She has lived in Delft for eight years now.
Mrs. Nompilo has three children and one completed university from the street vending income. She now works as a human resource specialist in a private company. Another one is completing her grade twelve and is preparing to go to university. The last born is in grade eight and helps her mother when the school time has ended. Mrs. Nompilo admits that life has not been easily albeit she has not gone to sleep without a meal with the street vending.
As she observed her daughter complete university she was inspired to finish her high school with ABET classes. She put school on hold when she married and promised herself to return when opportunity allows. Even with the marriage duties and responsibilities she knew she was going to return and finish school one day. In a friendly gesture I told her she would be an inspiration to herself if she managed to return to school and finish her grade 12. I sat there observing and watching Mrs. Nompilo interact with her clients. When she returned to me for our conversation she told me that she will pursue business management studies in order to run the business professionally and from a building. Mrs. Nompilo imagines herself competing with and at the level of Mzoli’s Place with her business venture. She says Mzoli’s place is an inspiration to all braai meat venders. And Mzoli’s Place also began from humble beginnings.
Indeed great success stories truly come from people with humble beginnings. Listening to and watching Mrs. Nompilo exuding hope and inspiration I began wondering about my hopes and dreams as a writer. It has been long since I sat down with someone from humble beginnings to revive my spirit. When I began writing I found great inspiration from the great Italian writer Dante. The experience of mental illness, however, knocked me down. I suffered a great fall. It took all my will power to imagine and realign myself. I had to re-strategize. I moved up and down Cape Town seeking the best experiences to re-ignite hope and optimism. I read through library books and spoke to a psychologist to no avail. My doctor has been wondering what could be the source of my despondent spirit. I have learned from my experience with Mrs. Nompilo that it takes humility and simplicity to awaken some spirits sometimes. Immersing myself into the township experience gave me a reason to live again –albeit from the thrashing energy of my illness.
It takes experiences and people like Mrs. Nompilo for some spirits such as mine to be awakened from a fall. When you hear from someone like Mrs. Nompilo about their fall and how they had to learn to get up or sleep for eternity you stand up. It is the narrative that revives you. It pumps you with the “if she did it so can I” attitude. She had to defer her dreams for marriage when she was marrying. She further put her dreams on hold when her husband fell ill. Only now her dreams are rearing towards a tangible future.
See I come from a humble background and have gotten used to the struggle of black people. It is stories like hers that speak to my spirit. She speaks to me as a child of a peasant worker. I worked very hard not to be trapped in the trenches of the marginalised masses.

But life as I am learning is not guaranteed. It is angels such as Mrs. Nompilo that saves falling angels such as me. As they stand on street corners serving those with desire for their meat, they are also angels waiting for saviours.

Up you mighty race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Staff Writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

“For The Love of Humanity”

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

 

From Granaries To Royalties, The Case Of Lesotho| Lindiswa Jan

From Royalties to Commoners, The Case Of Lesotho| Lindiswa Jan
It has become common place to see the African desponded and running around calling for the government to provide certain services. To be a protestor is all that she knows. She is always stationed as though she is waiting for something. She is in transition, a prolonged transition. It is almost like it is his or her second nature to be constantly aggrieved from suffering and agitation by crime. It seems like it is her identity to live in damp and crime ridden squatter camps in Philippi. It has become a usual sight to see her mentally unresponsive self, living with severe lacking and chronic poverty. All of this seem and feel normal to the African. The life of death is a daily bread. In fact, death is better than life to her. The African is a shadow of something very distant from her. Her memory does not serve her well. She does not know herself.
From royalties to commoners is a realisation that the African has suffered a great fall. We were once dynastic royalties that commanded grace and great armies. We ancestrally had and ruled empires. Anthropologically we ruled and traded with the world. The north bowed down to us as we gracefully built unprecedented civilisations. We invented needles, toothbrushes, spoons, plates, pots, and light-bulbs. We engaged in civilised diplomatic missions. We had diplomatic marriages and businesses with the eastern world. We educated the European. We travelled afar on ships we built ourselves. We ate healthy meals from the land we worked. But all that and many more over time disappeared. Hunger and starvation became our lot. Refugee crises ensued causing international crises for centuries. Our affairs began being managed by international crisis and donor organisations. Our ability to feed ourselves was reduced to the Red Cross Foundation. What happened? What went wrong?
If starting with 663 bc one can see the encroachment and conquest by the Assyrians. The attack was severe if judging from the Arab occupation of Egypt. The Assyrians had a stake in attacking and conquering Africa. One can see in the now Arab population that occupies Egypt. There is almost no human trace that Africans lived and ruled from Egypt. Only the ancient architectures and tombstones tell us that we lived and ruled in Egypt.
Following in the footsteps of the Assyrians one can also see Alexander the Great’s distraction and destruction of the Upper Nile Valley. With Alexander’s rule Egypt grew to having a significant light skin population from the original dark skinned ancestors. Alexander the Great is known for having appreciated mixed-race marriages. He himself diplomatically married an Assyrian princess. Cleopatra descended from these mixed-race marriages.
However, looking down and further into the wars of conquest into the 1st ce, going up to the1400ce, followed by the slave trade in Ghana, one can see the defeats suffered by Africans. Africans were engaged in wars of conquest by military generals such Alexander the Great who wanted to rule over Africa. Slave owners from the Americas were engaged and traded with slave traders in Africa. They all wanted to conquer and rule Africa. The upper Nile Valley was an empire civilisation with trade ties with the rest of the continent and the world. The civilisation commanded respect for it inventions and accomplishments. Enemies and foes killed for the civilisation. And moving closer and down to Monomotapa empire and into the 20th century we look into the Mfecane destabilisation of African Kingdoms in the 1800s. We need to know what befell us in order for us to rebuild ourselves for new and better prospects. We are people who build civilisations and we need to appreciate that and start somewhere again.
Not downplaying the previous centuries, but by the early 1900s Lesotho was a self-sufficient Kingdom until the onslaught of colonialism and apartheid on the front-line states. “From granary to labour reserve” is a narrative about Lesotho’s journey from a grain producing country to a labour reserve. In it Colin Murray writes about the tragedy that befell Lesotho when apartheid South Africa placed it under its South American imported grain wing. Having produced and stored grains for its people, Lesotho became a labour reserve when apartheid South Africa began importing grain from Brazil. Apartheid South African replaced Lesotho’s grain in South Africa and neighbouring countries with Brazil imported grain. Lesotho could not compete with South Africa in selling its grain to other countries. The country fell from grace to a labour reservoir.
Known for grain production Lesotho managed to feed its people and saved the remaining grain for rainy days. This was until apartheid South Africa reduced Lesotho from its granary power to a labour reserve for South African mines.
During the times of King Moshoeshoe Lesotho and its people experienced the high life of royalty. Their King protected them from being destroyed when he migrated up to the mountainous settlement from South Africa. The King wanted his people to maintain their Kingdom –and keep their independence by all measures. Migrating to the mountains he managed to save his royalty, legacy and heritage and made sure that Basotho people remain royal descendants. The royal power structure of Lesotho was challenged and left confused when apartheid South Africa destroyed its granary production.
In the like manner that Lesotho was attacked and destroyed, Africans in South Africa suffered and still suffer the same fate. From the destruction of the royal Kingdoms colonialism and apartheid South Africa gave birth to squatter camps and matchbox houses. Prior to the formation of the Union of South Africa, Africans of the Monomotapa Empire prided themselves with their trade in iron, ivory, beads, leather materials and pottery. Their authority flew from the royal houses of their Kingdoms. They respected themselves and their royal Kingdoms and they were well fed. These Kingdoms were destroyed one by one by the British colonial mission. The last Kingdom to be destroyed is the Kingdom of amaMpondomise which was destroyed in 1904. South Africans have been and have served as commoners and menial labour reserves ever since.
The new popular educator provides a simplified and good to read content on some of the content in this paper. It will serve the reader well to borrow the books and read for themselves. It will be better that the African National Congress depend on reading history when making policies and policy decisions. This will allow the government to treat African people with more dignity and respect.
While proud of its achievement since 1994, the African National Congress must also remember that in the matchbox houses and informal settlements there live dead royalties. They are African royalties! While appearing as commoners for labour reserves, those African children are royalties who were interrupted in their histories through colonial and apartheid encounters.

 

When designing homes for resettlement, for example, the congress must keep in mind that they are attending to mentally dead royalties. Awaken us with royal love and respect when offering services to us. We must have done something really bad and serious to suffer such a fall –and to the enslavement conditions we are subjected to.

 

Up you mighy race, accomplish what you will.

Article by: Staff Writer at Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Image: Lindiswa Jan Art and Humanities Institute.

Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

Email: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

“For the Love of Humanity”

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

Enough Purging For The Day| Lindiswa Jan

History Leaves Marks in Stones| Lindiswa Jan

In 2016 I visited my childhood home, the farm I was born and raised in, in the Karoo region of the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

It had been 20 years since I last set foot at the farm. My last departure there was in 1994, thereafter, my life and dreams at the farm faded out of existence. It seemed as though I wanted to forget about it and live a new life. But deep down in my heart I suppressed deep feelings of loss and tragedy with the move and migration out of the farm. But somehow I knew one day I will return and do something at the farm again.

It was in 2016 that I had to return to the farm. It was not fun nor was it for fun to return there.

My visit was for an ancestral libation ritual at my grandfather and paternal grandmother (my father’s mother)’s gravesite. I was ill and needed their spiritual intervention for release in my then stagnated emotional and mental health.

I was conflicted and in deep pain and needed help. I did not know who to turn to after many attempts attending to my wellness needs from different perspectives.

Faced with a possibility that I was going through a chronic mental health problem, I prayed to the Rastas that I be saved from the emotional and mental pain I was going through. Not long after, in a dream-like state, I saw Emperor Haile Selassie I, adorned in His royal military regalia, his hands adorned in and covered with white gloves. With His right hand, back and forth, he was waving a whip, walking like my late paternal matriarch great-grandmother used to walk at the farm when she was hunting us with a whip for misbehaviour. He was walking alongside and towards the back of the Baxter Theatre at the University of Cape Town, not far from where I lived on campus at that time completing my studies.

When I woke up the following day the lucid dream vision of Him was still very clear in my mind and spirit. In that moment and at that time I knew I was in trouble. My prayer to the Rastas, by extension my ancestors, was being answered and it was about to be biblical. I always knew Rastas are healers but had not yet given them much time to focus on and understand them.

From thereon, a chain of events unfolded leaving me in a state awe and wonder with a complete awareness that my arkashic records have been opened and hell broke loose. Who was I –to dream about Emperor Haile Selassie I? In what universe does that happen? Soon I learned it was the African universe and only the Rastas live in that universe.

Emperor Haile Selassie I was the last standing emperor of Africa in Ethiopia. His imperial government was deposed with a coup in 1974. In 1975 he died an unhappy royal child of the universe –who’s royal –translate legal –right was taken away from him. For him to have been an Emperor of Africa, he must have been cosmically chosen by African gods –hence the Rastafari community’s “Rightful Elect of Jah”, “The Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah” and the “King of Kings” salutations and titles. His Ethiopian coronation to be emperor was a cosmic royal affair. Only African gods bestow that godhood privilege to African children. Mortal beings do not have that long reach on earth.

For this reason, Africans ought to have bowed down to and respected HIM with everything and all we are and have. As I learned, though, the independence era African leaders were conflicted about and divided on Emperor Haile Selassie I’s ethnic and racial identity –and they felt that he did not fully represent the African identity as they wanted him. It was only Ghana’s prime minster, Kwame Nkrumah, who rightfully saw beyond and above the ethnic and racial identity discourse that caused confusion and discussion.

By virtue of his work and load in Ghana, Kwame Nkrumah was spiritually empowered above and beyond the mortal understanding of the African heritage dissidents. He firmly stood on the pan African teachings of Marcus Mosiah Garvey about the emperor of Africa. Till his death, Kwame Nkrumah knew and understood that Haile Selassie was rightfully elected the Emperor of Africa. All they needed to do was to honour that power.

However, Ras Tafari’s physical appearance caused many African leaders to disregard him and his cosmic rulership, leading to his deposition with the coup in 1974. As a cosmic child, a child favoured by the Black gods, this caused a cosmic cataclysm. Africa was thrown back into the ages of darkness. I learned as a child that African children can cause rain when we want and wanted to. It is the purity of the hearts that the universe responds to. And so was Haile Selassie. He was a child of the cosmos. A cosmic healer! But Africans never learn to respect things of the highest order.

To date, not many Africans have an understanding that our actions are guarded cosmically by the gods of Africa. Everytime we fail to honour them they send us back into darkness to figure ourselves out before we can be restored into wholeness and fullness. Thus, we cannot be whole and fulfilled until we understand the causes and implications of Emperor Haile Selassie I’s rulership and discard from it as if he was a commoner.

It took me going back to the farm to figure this and other issues of concern out. This happened when I was tossed into darkness –after I prayed to the Rastas for a way out of mental illness dilemma. My great grandmother who was a matriarch at the farm responded in the form of Haile Selassie.

After I saw Haile Selassie in a dream-like vision, I was sent into the darkness of self-discovery, moving back, backwards into my childhood. When the time came for me, I had to pray to my ancestors and ask for guidance to enlightenment again. It was then that my family took me to an African healer queen mother. On diagnoses that my ancestors are reaching out and trying to communicate with me, she directed that I go home and appease them with rituals for harmony.

In reconnecting with my childhood at the farm, I walked up towards the direction where I lived with my mother and father’s families. Remembering my childhood, I took images of the old building structure where we lived including the stone walls where my grandparents’ pigs were kept and fed. I wept, looking around the mountainous slope where we played and chased each other as children. I could hear our childhood sounds of screams and laughter as we chased and ran after each other. I wept. My cousin was standing at a distance so I did not have disturbances in my moment of memory capturing.

I looked at the dams where we watched each other learn to swim. Looking back at the long stone wall behind me, I photographed an area written ‘SK 1920’ with a black paint. The writing has been there since my childhood. What it means I don’t know. All I know is that like Egypt, history leaves marks in stones. It is the prerogative and duty of the historian and anthropologist to decipher the meaning. It is that meaning I am extrapolating here.

And after I finished recording the recorded history, I returned to the gravesite of my grandparents. I did libation with brown sugar water and left them with snuff tobacco and crystals I bought in Cape Town. With my grandfather, I left a Tiger’s Eye and with my grandmother, I left a Moonstone. The result was that I had purified tears. I cried, seeing the lift of the heavy load.

This is how I became a Rasta!

~~~

Images: Lindiswa Jan/Fine Art America

Follow us on Twitter: @LindiswaJan

Like and Follow us on Facebook: @LindiswaMJan

E-mail: lindiswa.jan@gmail.com

❤💛💚 World Wide Bless ❤💛💚

 

%d bloggers like this: